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Easy to Grow Cut-Flowers

Start a flower garden with these easy to grow cut-flowers and you’ll have gorgeous blooms all summer long!

easy to grow cut flowers. photo of bachelor buttons

With summer just around the corner, now is the time to start thinking about planting seeds in the garden! If you’ve never grown flowers before but you’re thinking this summer might be a good time to start, I’ve complied a list of my favorite, easy to grow cut-flowers. These flowers require little effort to maintain and they will reward you with beautiful blooms all summer long. Imagine your house filled with gorgeous home grown bouquets of flowers. Read on to learn more about these easy to grow cut-flowers. And of course, if you are just getting started, be sure to read my blog post on How to Start Your Own Cut Flower Garden.

Cosmos

close-up of easy to grow cosmo flowers
Close-up of a cosmo. Cosmos produce an abundance of fresh cut-flowers.

Cosmos are perhaps one of my favorite cut-flowers to grow. In most locations you can direct seed cosmos after the danger of frost has passed. Cosmos grow quickly and produce an abundance of blooms all summer long. You will want to pinch the center of the plant when it’s about 12’’ tall to encourage it to branch out. My favorite varieties of cosmos include Double Click and Cupcake Blush. Cosmos do not have a long vase life, but they are beautiful either in a mixed bouquet or in a vase by themselves. 

Zinnias

close up photo of purple zinnia
Zinnias are one of the easiest cut-flowers for beginners to grow

One of the easiest cut-flowers to grow are zinnias. I usually prefer to direct seed zinnias outdoors after all danger of frost has passed. These cut-flowers are heat tolerant so they grow well in most regions. You do have to be careful with watering though as they can be susceptible to powdery mildew. Once the plant is about 12’’ tall you will want yo pinch the center stem so that the plant will branch out and grow more stems. 

I love that zinnias come in a wide variety of colors and also different heights. They should be picked when the stem is no longer soft. Your zinnias will have a longer vase life if you wait to pick until the stem has firmed up. My favorite varieties are those that have giant double blooms.

Marigolds 

close up of marigold flowers
Marigold Photo by Nazmus Sakib on Unsplash

Marigolds are another one of my favorite cut-flowers to grow. I actually love to grow marigolds for the foliage. I use the branches to fill my cut-flower bouquets. You can either start marigolds from seed indoors or direct seed outdoors after the danger of frost has passed. Marigolds are also great at deterring certain bugs and pests from your garden. I like to plant marigolds near my tomato plants.

Bachelor buttons

bachelor buttons
Bachelor Buttons produce lots of beautiful little flowers that make great bouquet fillers.

Another one of my favorite easy to grow cut-flowers are bachelor buttons. You will want to direct sow these seeds in the garden after all dangers of frost have passed as they do not like being transplanted. Bachelor buttons will produce large branching stems of flowers. These also make great bouquet fillers. Be sure to cut your bachelor buttons frequently to encourage new growth.

Sunflowers

sunflower
Single stem pro-cut sunflower

Sunflowers are always a fun one to grow in the garden. I prefer to direct seed my sunflowers after all danger of frost has passed. There are two main types of sunflowers, branching sunflowers and single stem sunflowers. Branching sunflowers produce an abundance of blooms and need more space to spread out and grow. Single stem sunflowers produce only one sunflower. You will want to plant your single stem sunflowers closer together to keep them from growing huge stalks. My favorite varieties of sunflowers include Panache and ProCut White Lite (white sunflowers).

Amaranth

burgundy amaranth
On the left of the greenhouse are Cosmos growing and to the right are Amaranth

Amaranth is a productive and easy to grow cut-flower. These plants can get quite large just like sunflowers. I personally love the texture that amaranth adds to a home bouquet. Amaranth is usually either a deep burgundy or green plant. I prefer to grow the deep burgundy, Amaranth Opopeo. I like to add this variety into my late summer bouquets with dahlias. Amaranth can either be started indoors or directed seeded after all danger of frost has passed.

My Favorite Seed Suppliers For Flower Seed:

Floret Flowers

Johnny’s Seeds

Renee’s Garden

Finally, be sure to check for your zone’s last annual frost date. If you are starting your flowers from seed, you may need to wait until the last average frost date. I prefer to start my seeds indoors to get ahead start on the growing season so I can plant outdoors after the danger of frost has passed.

Are there any other varieties of easy to grow cut-flowers that you like to grow in your garden? If you found this post helpful, I’d love for you to share this with others. Feel free to Pin to Pinterest. And don’t forget to subscribe below to stay connected with The Flowering Farmhouse.

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12 Comments

  1. ‘Wonderful selection of bright and vibrant cutting flowers! Thank you for the detailed information!

  2. This was such a beautiful post and features some really gorgeous flowers. I have a few friends who are really interested in gardening so I will definitely share!

  3. I absolutely love having fresh cut flowers, but never thought of growing them myself! These are all so beautiful, and my favorites are the zinnias and amaranth.

    1. I love both of those as well! It’s so nice to fill your home with bouquets from your own yard!

  4. What a beautiful post!! I have always dreamed of having Sunflowers in my garden but always felt overwhelmed on how to do it! This post has just given me the inspiration to go do it! I am a total beginner though, so fingers crossed!! Dharma X

    1. Sunflowers are one of my favorites! They attract the bees and even some hummingbirds to my garden. The closer you plant them together, the smaller the stalks on the plant. Hope it goes well for you!

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